Type and Typography- by Phil Baines and Andrew Haslam

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First and foremost, this book has a very nicely designed cover and overall layout—something that matters less for other books, but for a book on type and design is crucial.

What surprised me the most about this book is the level of depth this book achieves. It goes from the proverbial “what is typography” question and lays out a very in-depth course about type—-it’s functions, the basic forms, invention of typefaces, and the classification of type.

It’s an excellent place to start learning. Concepts are broken up into manageable sections for optimal readability. Each concept is outlined in a bold heading with a smaller, readable description. This makes it a book that you can pick up and put down again in increments without fear of losing your place.

Vocabulary is explained with straightforward and very helpful examples.

There are various examples of different uses of type throughout the book. However, it does not become so crowded with examples that it detracts from the basic lessons of the book. The examples range from ancient to contemporary, which makes it an excellent reference to inform the most contemporary work.

It covers the history of older typefaces and the origins of what we know as “type” from stone-carved to hand-drawn to letterpress and into the digital age. It even covers editing type in illustrator. Most impressively, it has a section on type and the web, which is a field that changes so constantly that many books are afraid to address it.

Additionally, each spread makes for very satisfying design. For its imagery alone, this book is something that I would like to own as both an illustrator and a designer.

— 3 years ago
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